(leer)

Navigation and service


Quantitative cerebral water content changes after CSF removal in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a chronic and generally, in its early stages, reversible disorder in aged people, characterized by the gradual onset of a triad of gait impairment, cognitive dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. As the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms still remain unclear, the aim was to verify the hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) exudation into periventricular white matter, and to investigate wether the clinical improvement after CSF removal is regulated by changes of the cerebral water content and spatial water distribution. This project is performed in collaboration with the Department of Neurology at the RWTH Aachen University (JARA-BRAIN Group of Prof. Reetz).
The quantitative and non-invasive measurement of tissue water content using magnetic resonance imaging aids the monitoring and interpretation of the disease-related integrity of brain tissue. This method has already allowed for a better characterization of several different neurological pathologies in which local or global disturbances in the water distribution and content were identified.
The quantification of changes in water content may help to better understand the pathophysiological basis of iNPH and thus identify predictors for reversibility of clinical symptoms, e.g. due to reduced water content after CSF removal in disease-relevant structures such as periventricular regions.



Quantitative cerebral water content changes after CSF removal in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

Quantitative water content (in percent) before (upper level) and after (lower level) CSF removal in one iNPH patient (male). Preliminary analysis shows reduction of cerebral water content (up to 3 %) after CSF removal especially in periventricular white matter tissue.

Additional Information

Contact Person

Prof. N. J. Shah, PhD

Zaheer Abbas, Dipl.-Phys.


Servicemeu

Homepage